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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 3,262 (some duplicates have been removed)
that -- we used to say 60,000 illegal or unauthorized units in thant of those that exist. people live in them. what does that mean? probably, they were built without a permit, or the use of them is a not-permitted use. it does not necessarily mean that work done to add a room down in a basement behind de garage was done without a permit, but the actual use of the finished space might be a non-authorized users, non- permitted use. >> you might have -- >> you could have a room downstairs. you could have a sink in the room as a family room with a wet bar, maybe. the city starts getting funny about that kind of thing. it sounds like an illegal unit already. it is not always a bad thing. i would not say that in many instances, legalizing -- "legal" is a strong term. in our business and sales business, we try to avoid that term. it has many implications. to say something illegal is -- to say something is legal or illegal has a lot of implications. we cannot really say. we can say it does permit it or not permit it. what is or is not authorized is a different statement. we have to be mindful. one th
people and the way they think about united states. it is still on the list of reasons people become extremists, reasons recruiting tool for terrorism, it hurts us that way. it is not us. trafficking, we want to fight trafficking. it is a terrible thing. that is not u.s. policy. this is u.s. policy. this defines who we are. it is that stain on our reputation. i want to finish with what andy worthington said. i don't know whether people here have watched the movie lincoln, but it really is a story of how abraham lincoln pushed through an amendment to the constitution to free the slaves and when you look at it, that wasn't something, there were a lot of other issues around that he could have avoided that issue to bring the state's back together for economic reasons, stop killing to end work, lots of other issues and people were saying why does this matter to him? he forced it through, a moral issue defining what the country was going to be, what was going to be about. there are a lot of inconveniences, yemen or other things, to close in guantanamo. political inconveniences and oppositi
, which really are just people united by the idea of how old they are and may or may not be services available. there may not be a common clubhouse. >> you cook your own. >> cook your own food, clean your own place and arrange your own transportation. that is bare bones and nice because everyone around you technically is the same age group. there is a big difference between someone 55 and someone 80 and 95. >> uh-huh. >> that is three generations. >> let's talk about the assisted living and nursing homes. >> assisted living, and those are defined by the state of california. the assisted living is where it may or may not be run by a nurse. doesn't have to be run by a nurse but someone skilled and working around some older adults. they not going get one-on-one care or therapy and not getting injects. skilled nursing setting is twofold. one is someone who fell and broke a hip, needs to get back on their fight and go to rehabilitation and they're getting attention through physical therapy and occupational therapy. then there are folks who need someone keeping an eye on them maybe with t
and beneficial plant. it is part of their cultural heritage. it is like telling people in the united states to stop making coffee by next year. >> there is a lobbying effort at the u.n. to try to have some of these traditional uses recognized. how much support is then going to be at the u.n. level after that? >> unless countries actively block bolivia's efforts to return to the u.n. conventions with the reservation that only the polls traditional uses of coca, 1/3 -- upholds the traditional uses of coal, 1/3 of the members have to object. the only country to object was the united states. >> could we start to see some of the thinking come into a more realistic picture of what is happening? >> to the extent that this is a bolivian issue with a bolivian generate the solution, i think the u.n. is calling to be amenable to that. some of the difficulties arise when we talk about the model getting exports outside the country. there is a different cultural traditions and bolivia. going back to the point about the amount of coca that is grown and with the use is for, what we have seen over the years
5 thousand summer jobs for young people in partnership with the united people in the bay. we also were involved in other events that will place the youth of this city in jobs. in fact, the first s f young people are graduating. in a disversus community not everyone wants to work in construction jobs. working with our workforce nonprofits like j v s and young community developers and we need to expand them. next week i'm looking forward to attending the cad any to see all the folks who are graduating. our industry contributes good paying jobs to our hospitals, universities and medical firms. and finally, to fully insure that our economic recovery reaches every people in the community we must join with our democrat leader president obama and shout immigration reform for our country this year. we're - we are a city of imgranite and we know that some are fathers and mothers and daughters and son who work hard to commit to this city. it's time to let them come out shadows of our city we must ask washington to pass the immigration reform bill. and we must demand a pathway to citizenship
on sncc and vietnam >> host: what happened with the people's history and the united states? how did that start to cover? >> guest: i think that was an outgrowth of the way in which he saw the world and the way in which the truth was being represented by american historians and textbooks. there was a study done the year before the people's assistant of the u.s. came out in 1980, the 1979 study was of a group of u.s. history textbooks and the research concluded those textbooks overwhelmingly the lives of ordinary people that never mentioned him pfft it glorifies the american triumphalism that the textbooks were essentially the stories of our wonderful akaka the businessmen, privileged corporate elite, etc., but you know nothing about, next to nothing about what life was like for ordinary citizens of the country. some of the figures who were heroes lies in the textbooks like christopher columbus hardly deserve to those that were being sent their way, that columbus in fact have been butchered them when he first landed in the new world and treated them with immense hardship and harshness
of political activity. what happened with a people's history of the united states? >> i think that was an outgrowth of the way in which he saw the world and the way in which the truth was being represented by american historians and textbooks. there was a study done the year before howard people's history of the u.s. came out in 1980. the 1979 study was of a group of u.s. history textbooks. and what the research that included was that those textbooks overwhelmingly ignored the lives of ordinary people. that never mentioned class conflict. instead they glorify the american triumph abysm that the textbooks were essentially the stories of wonderful president, general store business income are privileged corporate elites. you learn nothing, next to nothing about what life was like for ordinary citizens of the country. plus, howard understood that some of the figures who were in the textbooks like christopher columbus hardly deserve the encomiums that were being sent their way that columbus had butchered the indians when he first landed in the new world and treated them with immens
people in the united states and also mexico, how the war impacted them and their families, and some of the people i talk about in this war are abraham lincoln, who makes his first major political speech, his speech that i've been actually was quite widely documented and discussed in newspapers. his first major speech in congress is about the u.s.-mexico war, condemning the war. so lincoln's first political stance on the national stage is actually against the u.s.-mexico war. that's one person i talk about. another person i talk about is john j. hardin, who some of you may be familiar with. he was part of a very, very important family in jacksonville, and for a period of time he was the leading way politician in the state of illinois. not abraham lincoln. and it's only harden who gets in the u.s.-mexico war that some people have argued makes lincoln's path forward and is wrote to the presidency possible because he is really under the shadow of john hardin before that happen. hardens them is fascinating and they are deeply, deeply affected by the u.s.-mexico war. let me tell you about
one time as united states senator, my number one job is to represent what's best for the people of the united states of america. not the government of israel. they're criticizing him for that. i gotta tell you something any united states senator who says the opposite is a traitor right? >> good point! >> bill: yeah, the other thing, this is real personal with me because jim hormel is one of my best friends. he was our ambassador to luxembourg. he was the first openly gay ambassador. appointed by president clinton in 1998. i was at the state department when jim hormel was sworn in bid a lynn albright -- by madeleine albright and tim wu, his partner was there when he was sworn in. we were all in tears watching that historic moment. at the time, chuck hagel said he didn't deserve to be ambassador because he was openly gay and that sent the wrong message. he wouldn't be able to represent all of the people of the united states. i resent that he said that. he was dead wrong but he's changed his views since then. by the way, i don't know any republican senator from the midwest united s
just as important as a member of a specialty unit. there are probably people sitting in this room who said i got graffiti because nobody else wanted and it that is hard. there are officers like me and officers hired into my unit that love of job and see the value in it, see the value to the community. so you have got to have that interest or else, again, you are going to have not a successful officer. okay, so now you have found the officer and got him figured out and i talk a lot about officers, but the same applies to civilians and anybody in this audience, because my concept is anybody can be a graffiti expert. and a lot of that comes down to training. you know, where do you find this training? well, for us as police officers, we get a lot of it through approved current training classes and things certified by the state, post-classes and that is fairly consistent within a lot of states that have a group that authorizes what kind of training an officer gets. articles and books is fairly self-explanator y and the internet. if you are curious about anything having to do with gra
denied citizenship. the unite nations estimate that 13,000 people fled myanmar and bangladesh in 2012 with some dying on route. >>> economic growth doesn't always go with freedom of expression. an organization defending the rights of international journalist has put attention. reporters without orders on wednesday, the report ranks countries based on an assessment of the commitment made by government to protect freedom of the press. the organization did not put asean in the top 100. myanmar jumped up 18 spots to 151st place. the former military regime has ending the censorship.s to showing no signs of improvement, vietnam remained at 172 and laos at 168. the group saw a decline in south asia. india fell to 140th place. journalists were assaulted and threatened during anti-government protests in the country. pakistan took the 159th spot due to the absence of government policy to protect media workers. in pakistan, a reporter was shot dead by islamic militants. the reporters without borders index calls pakistan one of the most dangerous countries for journalists. >>> wildlife officials
's freezing here. we get only one blanket for family. many people are sick. >> representatives of quikuwaitd the united arabs pledged money. >> there's no military solution. this should be resolved through political solution. french troops are gaining ground in mali. they have taken control of the airport near algeria. french troops launched an operation three weeks ago. mali is a former frempnch colon. arabs have been kidnapped suspected of having links to the rebels and they have ramsacked shops. they sent a threat in nigeria. >>> three chinese naval vessels have left for exercises in the western pacific ocean be comments fueled concerns among china ea china's neighbors over how the military will deal with the number of territory disputes. >>> people living in china know the air they have been breathing is bad. they've created a higher smog alert to track air pollution. the amount of high particulate air has been high. an increasing number of chinese are suffering from respiratory problems. they decided to add a third level to their two-level smog alert. the highest warning now advises peo
and hope as a united people toppled a dictator. today, stifling teargas and plumes of smoke fill the air of a divided country. egypt's police are struggling to cope with the protesters. they, too, have suffered losses and are angry. when the country's interior minister came to pay his respects to fallen policemen, he was heckled by grieving colleagues and their families. and as it has for the past three days, nightfall brought more violence. outside a luxury five-star cairo hotel. with a predictable decision, police charged the crowd firing teargas. minutes later protesters returned lobbing stones and setting fires to block roads. there are few words president morsi can tell protesters. this man says the president must resign and new constitution must be written. another says only protests work with a regime that killed his people. >>> hundreds of families in brazil are mourning lost loved ones after a nightclub went up 232 people. officials believe the blaze display on stage. police say the majority of deaths were the result of smoke inhalation as the club's single exit was partially bl
is that for many of the families the credit readiness. so even if we can get people in and of course for the unit as miss egan described you have to go through a lottery process. so even if someone is picked no. 1 or no. 2 in the lottery, it's often the credit readiness of the credit scores and it's something that you can usually fix within two, three weeks. it takes months and sometimes longer to clean up that credit. what we have now shifted towards is expanding what was more traditionally thought of as homeownership counseling. they themselvess have recently shifted their model and so homeownership is one tool towards the larger picture of financial literacy and asset-building. because if you don't have that credit score you are not only to be able to fulfill your credit requirements for homeownership and even rental. the tricky thing we found for any financial literacy program, for it to be effective, people usually only attend those courses when it's linked to an imminent financial event such as i want to buy a house. it's difficult to bring someone in to say a year from now you might be rea
outgrowths of a lot of the political activity he was doing at the time. what happened with "a people's history of the united states," how did that start to come together? >> guest: i think that, too, was an outgrowth of the way in which howard saw the world with and the way in which the truth was being represented by american historians in textbooks. there was a study done the year before howard's "a people's history of the u.s." came out in 1980. the 1979 study was of a group of u.s. history textbooks, and what the researcher concluded was that those textbooks overwhelmingly ignored the lives of ordinary people, never mentioned class conflict and instead glorified american trium that limb. that the textbooks were, essentially, the stories of our wonderful presidents, generals, businessmen, privileged corporate elites, etc. but you learn nothing about -- next to nothing -- about what life was like for ordinary citizens of the country. plus, howard understood that some of the figures who were he -- heroickized in the textbooks like christopher columbus hardly deserved the kudos being
that is frequently said at rallies, and it's something like, [in spanish]. in other words, the people united will never be defeated. i think that it's clear demonstration of unity that has happened that this body and also at ntc and here that over the long two years that you guys have been struggling, that your unity and your persistence got you to where you are. so, thank you for your tenacity. i do want to express some interest in making sure that we move this thing along as fast as possible and get it implemented as quickly as possible. two years has been a long time coming and so if we can expedite this as quickly as possible to get it implemented so these youth can take advantage of this benefit quickly would be my best interest. >> we have a motion and second. all in favor say aye. >> aye. >> opposed say no. ayes have it, so ordered. congratulations, supervisor and members. [cheering and applauding] >> come back any time. [laughter] >> okay, ladies and gentlemen. pardon me? we are going back to the regular agenda now. we are going back to -- okay, we are going back to the regular agend
services in peru, philippines and indonesia. kosta is flying their flags at half mast. people are united in their freef over an accident that never should have happened. i last motor kevin when divers were searching for his body of his brother, russell. he still has hope. >> we have to wait until the ship has been refroted and taken away. maybe then we might find some answers. we may find them under the ship. that is where i think he is. hopefully waiting for a few months, six months, seven months, i don't know how long, but we will wait. >> 10 people are being investigated over the tragedy, including the ship's captain. indictments will be handed out by the end of february, but a trial is still months away. meanwhile, the operation to refloat the ship is under way. it is huge. it's sal advantage the most complex the world has ever seen. 400 divers and experts are working around the clock, but all will put down their tools for a moment of silence at 2045 . >> hundreds of thousands of people have been marching through the french captain. they want to block a new law that would legalize ma
tough days over the next several days. >> i want to assure the people of haiti that the united states is a friend, a partner, and a supporter. >> in the next few days, people are going to be running out of food, out of water, i mean, we need help, urgent. >> i want the people of haiti to know that we will do what it takes to save lives and to help they will get back on their feet. >> the people of haiti will recover and rebuild, and as they do, they know they'll have a friend in the united states of america. >> this is the beginning of the flowering of haiti's north across every single economic segment. ♪ >> can i tell you, there's nothing better than, when the academy bus pulled up and the kids started parading off the bus some were tentative and they've never seen anything as magnificent as this. >> it's life changing for the kids to come to a school like this, that has computers, that has this good quality teachers. and get a good education. >> oh! >> nice to meet you. >> again, nice to meet you. >> nice to meet you. >> these are our neighbors, these are great kids and we want t
website, cbnnews.com. >> george: young people acrosthe united states are taking up the fight to end human trafficking around the world. on college campuses in all 50 states, and more than 50 countries, they're shining the light on modern day slavery. as my colleague ephraim graham reports, they accepted their mission at a new year's conference called passion 2013. >> reporter: 60,000 students packed atlanta's georgiadome for a party. a time of worship. >> jesus in infinitely worthy of eternal admiration. >> reporter: and to hear god's word. this is passion 2013, an annual conference for young christians that grows larger each year. >> these students are coming together. lifting up the name of jesus together, and with that, it's a beautiful sight. >> reporter: this is an army of believers from all 50 states, and 54 countries. they are leading these young people in what many would call an impossible mission. it is called "end it now." it's a fight to end modern day slavery. >> one thing we can agree on is there are 27 million slaves, and there should be no more slaves. so we're going to lif
's protecting people's health. also, when people live in close proximity to units where there are smokers in apartment buildings or multi unit buildings, they are in danger of the smoke seeping into or kind of coming into their units or common areas as well and this can result in prospective tenants really being exposed to hazardous air in their buildings. i think this is an important measure, too, that will really help prospective tenants finding out more where they may be exposed to second hand smoke but it's usually after they sign a lease right now where people find this out. so this is a measure developed jointly by the mission sro collective and the san francisco (inaudible) to make an informed decision about the unit under consideration and if it meeting their needs. this disclosure policy also benefits land lords by reducing nuisance complaints regarding secondhand smoke. specifically, we'll hear from some republics -- reps from the department of public health, this requires landlords disclose units as smoke free or smoking optional. no leases can be changed midway through tena
for the united states died. 78,000 troops served in mexico, and it was a war that had a big impact on people at home. i reallimented to write a narrative that explored how people were impacted and their families and people talked both in the war are abraham lincoln, making his first major political speech, one i found, actually, quite widely documented and discussed in newspapers. his first major vote in congress was condemning the war. lincoln's first political stance on the national stage is against the u.s.-mexico war. that's one person i talk about. another person is john jay harden. some of you may be familiar with. he's part of a very, very important family in jacksonville, and for a period of time he was the leading wig politician in illinois, not abraham lincoln, and it's only hair din's death in the war that some argue makes lincoln's path forward and road to the presidency possible because he was under the shadow of john before that happened. hardin's family is fascinating and deeply, deeply affected by the u.s. mexico war war. like most people, you probably don't know a lot about
of the ships will be lowering their flags at half mast. people are united in their grief and remembering an accident that never should have happened. i last met kevin when divers will still searching for the body of his brother. they never found him. he still has so. >> we have to wait until the ship has been taken away. maybe then we might find some answers. then we might find him underneath the ship. that is what i think. hopefully, just for a few months or how long i have to wait. we will wait. the question people are being investigated over the tragedy including the ship's captain. indictments will be handed out by the end of february. the trial is still months away. the operation continues. this has salvage the most complex the world has ever seen. more than 400 engineers and experts are working around the clock. al jazeera. >> hundreds of thousands of people have been marching to the french capital to block a new law that would legalize a managed -- marriage and adoption by same sex couples. >> there may be dancing in the streets but these people have serious objections to the way
. the united nations says more than 60,000 people have died in syria over nearly two years of fighting between the government forces and rebels opposed to president bashar al-assad. a new analysis of the toll conducted for the u.n. human rights office took five months to complete using data from seven sources, including the syrian government. the number is higher than the previous estimate of 45,000 reported by the british best based syrian observatory for human rights. rupert colville, spokesperson for u.n. human rights commissioner navi pillay, discussed the syrian crisis on al jazeera wednesday. >> it became so complicated. there were so many different people reporting casualties, so many different places where violence and fighting was going on simultaneously. and no way really of verifying each and every case. so it has been a very difficult issue. but this is a real attempt to do exhaustive analysis of the information we do have. it should be treated as an indicative number, not as a real number, but we believe is probably the minimum. >> violence in syria is continuing to claim scores o
: today marks the third anniversary of the earthquake in haiti which killed more than 300,000 people. the united nations special enjoy to haiti, bill clinton laid a wreath at the mass burial site on the outskirts of the capital, port-au-prince. the u.s. is asked for 2-point billion dollars to fight cholera in heighty which had claimed 8,000 lives last year. as for the injuries suffered in the quake, magalie laguerre-wilkinson introduces us to an american whose skill is making a world of difference one step at a time. >> reporter: this is what port-au-prince haiti's capital, looked like three years ago. 60 minutes captured these images on the days that followed. >> i'm going to soak it in alcohol how. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands injury and had record number of amputations. adam adam finnieston was watching from home horrified. >> it was traumatic to see that type of devastation. >> the 40-year-old from florida has a unique skill haiti desperately needed. >> i'm a third generation doctor so seeing somebody missing a limb is something routine to me. >> routine. >> routine. what w
america and the caribbean forced millions of people to leave their homes to migrate to the united states. we will play an excerpt of a conversation that i had with juan as well as the film's co- director. i want to encourage you to call in as we go to clips of the film in the interview because the faster you call in, the more of the interview we can play. the number to call, at the bottom of your screen drought the show, 866-359-4334. 866-359-4334. if you would like to get a copy of this remarkable film that is opening all over the country in march, call in right now and pledged $100. "harvested in higher" is yours. if you pledge $100, you can also get the book of juan gonzalez, which the film is booked on. at holiday time, just a few weeks ago, the curators of the smithsonian recommended reading his book, which is required reading in classrooms across the country. it is an amazing book, "harvest of the entire." if you want to get both, what an incredible educational resource. the book and dvd are yours for contribution of $150. think about that as he watched recall in. let us know you a
-driven, fact-free analysis coming from such people, the united states will continue to get it iran policy wrong and will continue losing ground. in the middle east. a good example of what i'm talking about in this regard came in 2009 when, in a collective act of analysis by wishful thinking, american elites focused on former prime minister mousse a veef's campaign to unseat incumbent president mahmoud ahmadinejad in that year's iranian presidential election and on the green movement that emerged out of mousse a i have's campaign as the key to solving america's strategic problems in the middle east. american and other western elites widely anticipated a victory when in june 2009 ahmadinejad won, those same elites almost universeally condemned the outcome as a fraud. they did so even though every method logically-sound poll conducted in iran before or after the election including polls conducted by western polling groups -- 14 polls in all -- show that ahmadinejad's re-election with roughly two-thirds of the vote which is what the official results show that he got was eminently plausible, and ame
. >>> people in the united amariter are worried about their exports. the train on the supply is growing. now this fossil fuel driven nation is considering alternatives. >> reporter: an international exhibition is under way focusing on water supplies and renewable energy. the crown prince of the united arab emirates says they realize they have a limit. >> translator: the united arab emirates has been providing the world with energy for half a century. we'll continue our efforts to provide a stable supply. it's our responsibility as a member of the international community. >> reporter: what prompted the concern is an impending sense of crisis. the gulf nation could lose its status as one of the world's leading oil producers. in 2011, the uae was seventh in terms of production but energy demands in the nation amounting in the face of rapid urbanization and a growing population. one of the most pressing issues is the secure enough electricity to convert sea water into fresh water. the country gets much of its water from the sea but surging water consumption now has the uae using 70% of its elect
it means to be the government of the united states and clear people are released from guantanamo and not release them. compare that to some dreadful totalitarian regime that puts people in prison and throws away the key and says, that is the end of it. you will rot here. that is not honest. saying that we have our review process, but then we're not going to release you. that is more cruel than the dictatorship. until those men are released, that will be the situation. this apparently is not a great source of shame to many people. i do not understand why that is. if we were honestly saying that we would indefinitely detained these guys, and that is the and the story, it would be a different story. we would be attacking this from a different point of view. we're struggling to mobilize people to be outraged about this. we know that one of the stumbling blocks in this is congress. it is absolutely clear that congress has been a major stumbling block in the president being able to do this. congress has imposed onerous restrictions -- that is how one of the officials described it -- on
on congress. >> sandy killed at least 113 people in the united states. and left millions without power after pounding parts of the east coast in late october. new york and new jersey. they were hit hardest with the estimated storm damage in new york alone at almost $42 billion. people there still haven't gotten back inside their homes. >> as we were saying the congress will be sworn in today and a new speaker will be chosen on capitol hill and this is going to be
to be made both on-site and off-site and we have heard horror stories about the on-site units where people can't pay the homeowner's association fees and there is sometimes resentment in some buildings and sometimes off-site has advantages particularly if it's in the same vicinity. but that is not what we're talking about today. then the land dedication option, i have seen one project coming in future that will use that. it is a little bit disturbing because if you have an ownership project, and you are trying to do something that is similar to that land dedication doesn't have requirements. you could take the dedicated land and the mayor's office of housing could put as many units as it wants on there at any income level they want to do, as opposed to something that mirrors the project for which the land dedication is being done. i think that is really not consistent, if we're trying to get a cross-section of incomes, a cross-section of opportunities, it would seem that the project should have similar income levels and if it's for-sale, on the project, it should be for-sale on land dedica
is the united states, the sworn enemy of the korean people. >> the country's space agency launched a rocket last month. authorities claimed it was to orbit a satellite but other countries say north koreans were testing long-range ballistic missile technology. scientists in the north half carried out two previous nuclear tests in 2006 and 2009. experts have been suggesting for weeks that they could be preparing for a third. the united nations resolutions ban north korea from developing missile and nuclear technology. on tuesday the security council condemned the latest rocket launch and expanded its existing sanctions. the latest north korean statement says the country flatly rejects all u.n. security council resolutions. it also says that no dialogue on the denuclearization of the korean peninsula will be possible in the future. >>> but u.s. officials say some sort of dialogue has to happen on the korean peninsula before they engage in direct talks with the north. analysts say the north koreans are applying pressure to speed things along, but a senior american diplomat is urging them to first im
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 3,262 (some duplicates have been removed)